There are five ways to spell the /j/ sound in the English language: The letter “g” makes the /j/ sound when followed by an “e,” “i” or “y” in a word that is often derived from Greek or Latin (these languages do not use the “j” symbol to represent the /j/ sound). In other languages, letter G makes sounds that wouldn’t even occur to English speakers. If there is a W at the end of a word it is acting as a vowel in a digraph like AW, EW, or OW (including glow and allow), not as a consonant, so final consonant rules don’t apply. Maeve listed examples of English words that have a hard G when a U is there: You will improve your English in only 5 minutes per day, guaranteed! The letter “g” makes the /j/ sound The letter “g” makes the /j/ sound when followed by an “e,” “i” or “y” in a word that is often derived from Greek or Latin (these languages do not use the “j” symbol to represent the /j/ sound). If you divide as big-ger and beg-ger as examples of Gs at the beginning of syllable/word being pronounced hard when they should be soft, then you have a different rule violation. Hebrew names: Gideon, Gilead And final single Ls have still their own doubling rules in American, that involve syllabic emphasis rather than spelling. Most English words that derive from the Greek word for woman [gyne] follow the rule for g followed by y and are pronounced with a “soft g,” for example, misogynist: one who hates or is ill-disposed to women

The “c” is not doubled, but rather the “c” gains a “k”. @Rick: Likewise something like a word-final H. It is acting as part of digraph like TH, SH, GH, CH, PH; or is silently modifying a vowel that’s already long, or “flattened” (oh, duh).

The letter “g” changes sound in various words. A gyroscope is not just a toy. Its sound is heard in gas, got, gum, etc.

Let us look at a few examples: It is important to learn the five ways to spell the /j/ sound in the English language and the underlying rules behind each spelling to assist our students with accurate decoding and encoding skills. Another “g” sound eff as in cough, then a silent “g” in a word spelled in a similar fashion dough, Dale, “Guillermo” has a hard G sound because there is that U between it and the vowel I. [CDATA[// >